Photography Tutorials

 

Tutorials, Tips & Tricks.

 

Photography Tips & Tricks

 

 

1. Start with Cheaper Camera Models & Work your Way Up

 

 

It’s possible to get very nice photos with an inexpensive point and shoot. The more photos you take, the more you’ll know about what kind of camera to get when it’s time to upgrade.

 

 

2. Have a Camera on You At All Times

 

 

You can’t take great photos if you don’t have a camera on you, can you? DSLR, point-and-shoot or smart phone, it doesn’t really matter. As long as you have access to a camera, you’re able to capture those spontaneous and unique moments in life that you might have otherwise missed.

 

 

3. Use the Rule of Thirds

 

 

To use the rule of thirds, imagine four lines, two lying horizontally across the image and two vertical creating nine even squares. Some images will look best with the focal point in the center square, but placing the subject off center will often create a more aesthetically composed photograph. When a photograph is composed using the rule of thirds the eyes will wander the frame. A picture composed by the rule of thirds is more interesting and pleasing to the eye.

 

 

4. Hold your camera properly

 

 

You might not know it, but there is a right way and a wrong way to hold a DSLR camera. The correct way is to support the lens by cupping your hand underneath it. This is usually done with the left hand, with your right hand gripping the body of the camera. This helps to prevent camera shake. If you are gripping your camera with your hands on either side of the camera body, there is nothing supporting the lens, and you might end up with blurry photos. To get an even stabler stance, tuck your elbows into the side of your body.

 

 

5. Create a Sense of Depth

 

 

When photographing landscapes it really helps to create a sense of depth, in other words, make the viewer feel like they are there. Use a wide-angle lens for a panoramic view and a small aperture of f/16 or smaller to keep the foreground and background sharp. Placing an object or person in the foreground helps give a sense of scale and emphasizes how far away the distance is. Use a tripod if possible, as a small aperture usually requires a slower shutter speed.

 

 

6. Keep it Simple

 

 

Don’t try to pack too many elements into your image; it will just end up looking messy. If you just include one or two points of interest, your audience won’t be confused at where they should be looking or what they should be looking at. ?

 

 

7. Experiment with Shutter Speed

 

 

Don’t be afraid to play with the shutter speed to create some interesting effects. When taking a night time shot, use a tripod and try shooting with the shutter speed set at 4 seconds. You will see that the movement of the object is captured along with some light trails. If you choose a faster shutter speed of say 1/250th of a second, the trails will not be as long or bright; instead you will freeze the action. This technique works well if you are using a tripod and if you are photographing a moving object.

 

 

8. Be Patient and Persevere

 

 

With time, patience, and perseverance, you will get better; with each and every photo you take.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copr @Shani K

 

 

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